Happy Passover! (almost)

Passover begins this coming Monday, April 14th. If you are planning to teach about the Jewish Holiday,  or are looking for new ways to celebrate; our members have suggested a few delightful songs to help you do just that.

Illumination from the Rylands Haggadah in the John Rylands Library in Manchester. The Preparation for the Seder (above) and The Celebration of the Seder (below).
Illumination from the Rylands Haggadah in the John Rylands Library in Manchester. The Preparation for the Seder (above) and The Celebration of the Seder (below).

Member Brigid Finucane has found this song to be very popular. She says: “For my 2’s classrooms, we just sing each item with the corresponding movement. My 3-5s sing it as a cumulative song. I found pictures of everything and put it in album on my iPad which I show like a little book.” *note: Pesach is the Hebrew word for Passover

On Pesach We Eat Matzot: Cumulative song

On Pesach we eat matzot.               Lots and lots of matzot.

It’s yummy in my tummy.                Lots and lots of matzot.

On Pesach we eat chicken.                Finger licking chicken.

It’s yummy in my tummy.                Finger lickin’ chicken, and lots and lots of matzot.

…Gfelte fish/ smelly in the belly gfelte fish.  It’s yummy in my tummy,…

…Matzo ball. rolla rolla rolla rolla matzo balls. It’s yummy in my tummy,

Rolla rolla rolla rolla matzo balls.  Smelly in the belly gfelte fish,  finger lickin’ chicken,

and lots and lots of matzot.

Horseradish. Hot, hot, hot, Horseradish. It’s yummy in my tummy.

Charosets. Chop chop chop chop Charoset. It’s yummy in my tummy.

Ending: …and lots and lots of matzot!! (up scale to end).

Hear the song in the video below, beginning at 3:07

Member Joanie Calem had this to share:

This is a traditional song from the singing of the Seder, which goes back and forth between the experience of slavery and the experience of freedom. I invite the children to move as they imagine slaves would feel during the lines about slavery, and move with the joyousness that recently freed people would feel during the lines about being free.

 Avadim Hayinu – words from the Hagaddah, music by Shalom Postolski

Avadim hayinu, hayinu,

Atah Benei Horin, Benei Horin.

Avadim hayinu, Atah, Atah Benei Horin.

Avadim, Avadim,

Atah, Atah Benei Horin, Benei Horin.

Atah, Atah Benei Horin, Benei Horin.

Once we were slaves, we were slaves.

Now we are free, we are free.

We were slaves, we were slaves,

But now, oh now, we are free.

We were slaves, we were slaves,

Now oh now oh now oh now we are free.

Now oh now oh now oh now we are free.

A Seder plate
A Seder plate

Member Sol Weber shared his two favorite Passover songs:

M-O-S-E-S Words, Sol Weber   Tune, “Bingo”

There was a man who freed the Jews,

and Moses was his name, oh.

M-O-S-E-S (3X) and Moses was his name, oh.

They were in bondage in that land.

Egypt was its name, oh.

E-G-Y-P-T (3X)….

They said “Good riddance” to that king.

Pharoah was his name, oh…

P-H-A-R-O (3X)….

Each day they ate unleavened bread,

Matzo was its name, oh….

We gather now in celebration;

Seder is its name, oh…

This is Sol’s own version of the beloved Dayenu, which can be added at environmentally conscious seders. It (and the original) can be done as a 2 part round, with entrances at the first and 3rd measures. The tune is well known.   Here are Sol’s words, in 8 measures:

Di di ox in.        Di di ox in.

Di di ox in, a       very nasty man-made toxin.

Di di ox in.         Di di ox in.

Di di ox in.          It comes to us from Dow !!

 For further learning, member Barry Louis Polisar adapted and published a Passover Haggadah a few years ago. It has been getting some nice reviews and endorsements for it’s accessible approach.  It is available as a free download on his web site—as well as published paperbacks via Amazon, Barnes and Noble, etc.

An ancient panel, that illustrates the morning prayer
An ancient panel, that illustrates the morning prayer