Happy Purim! (Almost)

Purim performance at the Jewish Theatre in Warszawa, Poland. March 2009 photograph by Henryk Kotowski
Purim performance at the Jewish Theatre in Warszawa, Poland. March 2009 photograph by Henryk Kotowski

Purim is a Jewish holiday that commemorates the deliverance of the Jewish people in the ancient Persian Empire where a plot had been formed to destroy them. It is celebrated every spring. This year, it begins the evening of March 15 and ends the evening of March 16.  A fun, joyful holiday, the Book of Esther is traditionally read in synagogue, and the children yell “boo!” every time the name of Haman (the bad guy) is mentioned, they also shake “groggers” the Yiddish word for noisemaker. As member Joanie Calem puts it, “it’s a very loud and musical holiday!”. Other ways Purim is celebrated include:

    1. Exchanging reciprocal gifts of food and drink known as mishloach manot

   2. Donating charity to the poor known as mattanot la-evyonim.

   3. Eating a celebratory meal known as a se’udat Purim’.

   4. Public recitation, usually in synagogue, of the Scroll of Esther known as kriat ha-megillah.

   5. Reciting additions to the daily prayers and the grace after meals known as Al HaNissim.

   6. Drinking wine, wearing masks and costumes, and parades.

                                                                                                             (learn more on Wikipedia)

First up, a song and mp3 by member Joanie Calem:

Purim Time Is Here by Joanie Calem

Hey everybody listen up, Purim time is here.

At Purim time things get mixed up, a crazy time of the year.

When we hear the name Haman, then we all yell “Boo!”…(3x)

’Cause Purim time is here (repeat and fade)

Hey everybody listen up, Purim time is here.

At Purim time things get mixed up, a crazy time of the year.

When we hear the name Esther, we all yell “Yay!”… (3x)

’Cause Purim time is here (repeat and fade)

Hey everybody listen up, Purim time is here.

At Purim time things get mixed up, a crazy time of the year.

When we hear the name Mordechai, we all yell “Yay!”… (3x)

’Cause Purim time is here (repeat and fade)

Hey everybody listen up, Purim time is here.

At Purim time things get mixed up, a crazy time of the year.

When we hear the name Haman, then we all yell “Boo!”

When we hear the name Mordechai, we all yell “Yay!”…

When we hear the name Esther, we all yell “Yay!”…

’Cause Purim time is here (repeat and fade)

(mix up any way that you want!)

From Joanie:

For this song, the children have noisemakers or shakers. They have to wait to hear which Purim character you put into the song, and then either yell “Boo” and shake their shaker for Haman, or yell “Yay” for Esther or Mordechai. You can obviously put other Purim characters into the mix if you choose!

Next up, a few more Purim song ideas shared by member Margaret Hooton:

Good Queen Esther

(to the tune of Turkey in the Straw)

Good Queen Esther went to town

 Bought a hamantaschen nice and brown

Bit off a corner and then she cried

“Goody, goody, goody, there are cherries inside!”

 

Brave cousin Mordechai went to town

Bought a hamantaschen nice and brown

Bit off a corner and then he cried

“Goody, goody, goody, there are blueberries inside.”

                                                                                          (now in a scary voice)

Mean old Haman went to town

Bought a hamantaschen over-browned

Bit off a corner and then he cried

“No, no,  no! There are stones inside!”

Five little hamantaschen

 (a spoken fingerplay)

Five little hamantaschen in a bakery shop (hold up five fingers)

Nice and brown with cherries on top  (arms over your head)

 Along came _______________with a penny to pay(gesture paying)

He took that lovely hamantaschen

And he ran away.  (pat legs quickly)

From Margaret:

This can also be played as a running circle game, with each child having a chance to pick a sweet, then run around the outside of the circle back to his/her place.  Make your hamantaschen out of felt, and you will have them for years!

Homemade Hamantaschen by Yoninah
Homemade Hamantaschen by Yoninah

 Hamantaschen is one of the yummiest parts of a Purim celebration, here’s a wonderful song about making them from member Brigid Finucane.

       Hamantaschen

What fillings are you going to use?

Let’s get our ingredients out – everything we need to make our cookies.

We need to grease our cookie sheets and turn the oven to 350 to preheat! Let’s go!

Chorus:

Haman – hamantaschen – for Purim! (or – So yummy!)

Haman – hamantaschen – for Purim! (or – So yummy!)

We’ll need 3 Eggs and 1 cup sugar

1.Well you crack ‘em, you crack ‘em,

You crack ‘em, crack ‘em, crack ‘em

Add your sugar, your sugar,

Your sugar, sugar, sugar,

Then you beat ‘em, you beat ‘em,

You beat ‘em, beat’ em, beat ‘em.

Measure ¾ c vegetable oil, 2 ½ t vanilla, ½ c orange juice,

and let’s grate in a little orange zest!

2. Then you pour ‘em, you pour ‘em,…

Then you grate ‘em, you grate’ em,..

Then you stir ‘em, you stir ‘em,…

Let’s mix in the flour. I think the dough is just right, nice and stiff.

Do you have y our rolling pin?

Sprinkle a little flour on top so it doesn’t stick!

3. Take your rolling pin and roll it, and roll it,…

Cookie cutter and you cut it, you cut it,….

Take it to the pan, and place it, you place it,…

What filling should we use? Let’s get our spoons.

4. Get our filling, then we fill ‘em, we fill em,…

Then we fold ‘em, we fold ‘em,…

Pinch the corners now, we pinch ‘em, we pinch ‘em.,,

They’re ready to go in the oven Let’s open the oven door. Be careful. Get your oven mitts!

5. Put the cookies in and bake ‘em, and bake ‘em,… – Bake for 12 minutes. Count to 12.

Take ‘em out and then you cool ‘em, you cool ‘em,…. Then what do we do?

We eat ‘em, we eat em,…

Do you have your rolling pins and cookie cutters?

©2014 Brigid Finucane

 

2 comments

  1. It may not be evident that my hamantaschen song is piggybacked on to “Peanut Butter and Jelly.” Sorry it was not included in the initial info. Also – it’s a bit confusing how I formatted it. The recipe part is spoken and acted out with the kiddos. I bring in a bowl, a beater, mixing spoon, rolling pin, cookie cutter, mini baking pan, etc., and use them as the song (and recipe) progresses. Hope this helps. brigid

  2. Thanks for the clarifications, Brigid!

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